Jackson Water Crisis: Two Virtual Sessions for Organizations & Community Responders

Let’s make sure recovery support stays equitable in Mississippi.

Several communities across Jackson are still recovering from the water crisis. For organizations, community leaders, and recovery teams still responding to the water crisis, we invite you to participate in two virtual sessions to help bolster recovery efforts.

Why Join?

The Project On Government Oversight (POGO), a national nonprofit based in Washington, D.C., will lead these sessions, providing detailed information on the current state of the water crisis as well as insight into where we can build advocacy efforts.

Topics include:

Session Details

The first session will take place Monday, June 24 from 10:00 to 11:30 a.m. (CT) and focus on the Freedom of Information Act (FOIA).


Register FREE


The second session will take place on Friday, June 28 from 12:00 to 1:30 p.m. (CT) and focus on current infrastructure spending and updates.


Register FREE


During each session, POGO Senior Investigator Nick Schwellenbach will provide a brief on the EPA and the Jackson Water Crisis. This information plays a valuable role in painting a full picture of the water crisis and where advocacy can ensure recovery efforts remain equitable, just, and effective across the state.

Don’t forget to refer a fellow leader or organization to join the session!

Where to Learn More

If you have any questions, contact Chauncey Spears, our Systems and Leader Engagement Manager, at spears@alluvialcollective.org.

This Month’s Book Spotlights Local Civil Rights Activists

June Book Giveaway

Learning and education are integral parts of the Alluvial Collective’s mission. What better way to educate ourselves than via a good read? With that in mind, we launched a monthly book giveaway recommending books that inspire us to discuss and reflect.

In June, we will give away a copy of Local People: The Struggle for Civil Rights in Mississippi by John Dittmer.

Click here to enter by June 21!

About the Book

For decades the most racially repressive state in the nation fought bitterly and violently to maintain white supremacy. In Local People: The Struggle for Civil Rights in Mississippi, John Dittmer traces the monumental battle waged by civil rights organizations and by local people, particularly courageous members of the black communities who were willing to put their lives on the line to establish basic human rights for all citizens of the state.

Join MCREC to Mobilize Communities and Protect Civil Rights Education

Protecting the preservation of civil rights history matters now more than ever. With many civil rights activists now in their 70s and 80s, the time to document, share, and uplift their stories is running out. Equally important is combating the rise of historical misinformation and generational knowledge gaps that prolong limiting beliefs and narratives that stand in the way of equity and inclusion.

For those looking to make a difference, the Mississippi Civil Rights Education Commission (MCREC) offers a great opportunity to do so. From now until June 14, 2024, people, educators, and community leaders can apply to become a Commission member and power important preservation work in the state.

Why Join?

MCREC will connect you to a community of people passionate about making a difference in their community. Working together, you’ll increase public awareness of the civil rights movement, its impact on Mississippi, and the importance of teaching it in schools. You’ll also get to speak to local politicians, civil rights advocates, and thought leaders about this moment in history.

Commission members serve for three years, which is comparable to serving on the board of a nonprofit or community organization. During your term, you’ll see the sustained impact of your work, build relationships, and power the preservation of vital moments in Mississippi history.

Apply Now!

Only by understanding the past can we unlock new possibilities for the future. Become one of the eleven volunteer members at MCREC and move Mississippi toward a brighter future. Click here to start your application.

If you have any questions, contact Chauncey Spears, our Systems and Leader Engagement Manager, at spears@alluvialcollective.org.

About MCREC

The Mississippi Civil Rights Education Commission (MCREC) is made up of representatives from The Alluvial Collective, Tougaloo College, the Oral History Project at the University of Southern Mississippi, and Jackson State University, with eleven volunteer positions. Our mission is to increase understanding of the important role the Civil Rights Movement had on the state of Mississippi and increase understanding the importance of teaching Mississippi’s children all of our history.

This Month’s Book Centers the Power of Belonging

May Book Giveaway

Learning and education are integral parts of the Alluvial Collective’s mission. What better way to educate ourselves than via a good read? With that in mind, we launched a monthly book giveaway recommending books that inspire us to discuss and reflect.

In May, we will give away a copy of Belonging without Othering: How We Save Ourselves and the World, by john a. powell and Stephen Menendian.

Click here to enter by May 27!

About the Book

The root of all inequality is the process of othering – and its solution is the practice of belonging. Brimming with clear guidance, sparkling insights, and specific examples and practices, Belonging without Othering is a future-oriented exploration that ushers society in a more hopeful direction, utilizing inclusion and acceptance.

This Month’s Book Explores 60 Years of Mississippi Civil Rights History

April Book Giveaway

Learning and education are integral parts of the Alluvial Collective’s mission. What better way to educate ourselves than via a good read? With that in mind, we launched a monthly book giveaway recommending books that inspire us to discuss and reflect.

In April, we will give away a copy of Standing Firm in the Dixie: The Freedom Struggle in Laurel, Mississippi by Derrion Arrington.

Click here to enter by April 22!

About the Book

Historian Derrion Arrington charts 60 years of civil rights history in Laurel, Mississippi through oral histories and archival research. This detailed and compelling work is the perfect addition to any cultural historian, civil rights advocate, or racial justice scholar’s library. Hear from Derrion Arrington in this upcoming CLS!

The Alluvial Collective, Mississippi Humanities Council, and Alcorn State University Co-Host “Critical Places” Art Talk

The Alluvial Collective, Mississippi Humanities Council, and Alcorn State University Co-Host “Critical Places” Art Talk

Join an open discussion on race and history inspired by Mikael Levin’s photographic project about sites of slave revolt.

Natchez, MS – The Alluvial Collective, Mississippi Humanities Council, and Alcorn State University Southwest Mississippi Center for Culture and Learning are co-hosting a conversation and art exhibition event to discuss race and history. 

The event begins with the launch of Mikael Levin’s exhibition “Critical Places: Sites of American Slave Rebellion” on April 3, 2024, from 1:00 p.m. to 3:00 p.m. (CT) at ASU’s Belles Lettres Hall. After the exhibition, guests are invited to join a facilitated dialogue circle from 3:00 p.m. to 4:30 p.m. (CT) to discuss their thoughts. Another dialogue circle will be available on April 4 at the same time and place.

Levin’s exhibition, which is touring the South, features compelling photographs of historic landscapes that were once the sites of slave rebellions, raising important questions for viewers about the history of race in America. 

“In showing how the rebellions of the enslaved are remembered in the landscape (or the lack thereof), I hope to prompt an awareness of how these rebellions still reverberate in social patterns and economic structures,” said Levin.

Inspired by the exhibited photographs, the Alluvial Collective’s dialogue circles provide a facilitated space for discussions with a focus on deep listening, storytelling, and radical empathy. 

“Over our 25 years of work, we’ve found that art serves as a very powerful entry point to engage with history. It takes people out of their usual way of thinking, leaving them open to new perspectives,” said April Grayson, Director of Community & Capacity Building at The Alluvial Collective. “The visual power of Levin’s photographs reminds people that history is among us, even in places that seem mundane.”

“Critical Places” will be on display until May 31. For more information, visit https://alluvialcollective.org/.

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About The Alluvial Collective: The Alluvial Collective works to end inequity based on difference by cultivating belonging and wholeness in the world. The Alluvial Collective does this by supporting youth engagement opportunities and creating intentional space for communities to bridge divides, form new connections, and work together to create measurable change across the state. Learn more about The Alluvial Collective by visiting our website: https://alluvialcollective.org/

About the Mississippi Humanities Council (MHC): The Mississippi Humanities Council is a private nonprofit corporation funded by Congress through the National Endowment for the Humanities. MHC’s primary goal is to provide public programs in traditional liberal arts disciplines to support nonprofit groups in Mississippi. Learn more: https://mshumanities.org/

About Alcorn State University (ASU): Founded as the nation’s first public historically Black land-grant institution, Alcorn State University has a history of creating opportunities for Black students in Mississippi and beyond. The Southwest Mississippi Center for Culture & Learning at ASU was developed to support local creativity and culture through community engagement and education opportunities. Learn more: https://www.alcorn.edu/academics/center-for-culture-learning/

This Month’s Book Exposes America’s Hidden History

March Book Giveaway

Learning and education are integral parts of the Alluvial Collective’s mission. What better way to educate ourselves than via a good read? With that in mind, we launched a monthly book giveaway recommending books that inspire us to discuss and reflect.

In March, we will give away a copy of Ghosts of Segregation: American Racism, Hidden in Plain Sight by Richard Frishman.

Click here to enter by March 25!

About the Book

Award-winning photojournalist, Richard Frishman presents a collection of photographs unveiling America’s history of segregation, slavery, and institutional racism. Accompanied by poignant personal essays from B. Brian Foster, a University of Virginia professor specializing in sociology and Black culture, and with a foreword by Imani Perry, a National Book Award winner, this book sheds light on these hidden aspects of our nation’s past.

Ghosts of Segregation is the perfect addition to any cultural historian, civil rights advocate, or racial justice scholar’s library.

This Month’s Book Centers Equitable Education

February Book Giveaway

Learning and education are integral parts of the Alluvial Collective’s mission. What better way to educate ourselves than via a good read? With that in mind, we launched a monthly book giveaway recommending books that inspire us to discuss and reflect.

In February, we will give away a copy of Fix Injustice, Not Kids and Other Principles for Transformative Equity Leadership by Paul Gorski and Katy Swalwell.

Click here to enter by February 23.

About the Book

Fix Injustice, Not Kids and Other Principles for Transformative Equity Leadership offers a deep dive into the leadership values, commitments, and practices that help educational leaders create and sustain equitable schools and districts.

Drawing from their extensive equity and inclusion work with schools, Paul Gorski and Katy Swalwell introduce key components of the equity literacy framework. They then challenge principals, equity professionals, and other K–12 leaders to embrace six guiding principles for meaningful equity leadership. This book is the perfect addition to any educator, equity leader, or social justice advocate’s collection.

This Month’s Book Explores Common Ground in a Divided World

January Book Giveaway

Learning and education are integral parts of the Alluvial Collective’s mission. What better way to educate ourselves than via a good read? With that in mind, we launched a monthly book giveaway recommending books that inspire us to discuss and reflect.

In January, we will give away a copy of Lessons on the Road to Peace by John Noltner.

Click here to enter by January 26.

About the Book

Lessons on the Road chronicles their exploration from immigration issues at the border to conversations about relocating Confederate monuments in Mississippi. They delve into housing security on Skid Row, tackling tough topics like race, environment, identity, and justice.

Through Noltner’s award-winning lens, the visual narrative captures a nation’s complexities while highlighting the resilience of human connection. In a world marked by division, their journey serves as a testament to the potential for understanding and innovative solutions to our most pressing issues.

History, Narrative, and Southern Reckoning in This Month’s Book!

December Book Giveaway

Learning and education are integral parts of the Alluvial Collective’s mission. What better way to educate ourselves than via a good read? With that in mind, we launched a monthly book giveaway recommending books that inspire us to discuss and reflect.

In December, we will give away a copy of The Steps We Take: A Memoir of Southern Reckoning by Ellen Ann Fentress.

Click here to enter by December 22.

About the Book

The Steps We Take tells how one woman reckons with a region’s history and her past. Through a lens ranging from intimate to the widely human, through moments painful and darkly comic, Fentress casts a penetrating light on what it means to be a white, southern woman today.

Support our collective movement to end inequity for all people.